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Paediatric Nutrition

Infancy and early childhood are critical periods of growth and development, when nutritional needs can be very high due to these rapid growth changes. When infants and children are unwell, for whatever reason, they are more vulnerable and are at increased risk of developing undernutrition, such as is seen in children admitted to hospital.[1,2] In order to meet the various nutritional needs of these children, products need to be based on sound scientific evidence providing the best solutions in line with latest scientific research, legislation, and medical recommendation.

 

References:

  1. Joosten KFM, Hulst JM. Prevalence of malnutrition in pediatric hospital patients. Curr Opin Pediatr 2008;20:590–596.
  2. Gibbons T, Fuchs GJ. Malnutrition: A hidden problem in hospitalized children. Clinical Pediatrics 2009;48:356-361.

Cow’s milk allergy

Cow’s milk allergy

Cow's Milk Allergy (CMA) is an immune response to cow’s milk protein.

CMA can present with a variety of symptoms generally affecting the respiratory tract (e.g. sneezing, wheezing etc.), the skin (e.g. skin rash, eczema etc.) and the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation).

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Maldigestion / malabsorption

Maldigestion / malabsorption

Maldigestion describes the inability of an individual to digest food in the gut [1] - malabsorption is the inability to absorb nutrients which have been digested from food through the gut.[1]

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Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening inherited condition, characterised by widespread exocrine gland dysfunction. The consequence of this disease is recurrent chest infections, pancreatic enzyme deficiency and excessive electrolyte losses in sweat. Thick secretions block the lungs and the pancreatic duct which leads to chest infections and pancreatic insufficiency.[1]

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Neurodisability

Neurodisability

Neurodevelopmental disabilities (neurodisabilities) are a diverse group of chronic disorders that can begin during the development process (including conception, birth, and periods of growth). They last throughout an individual’s lifetime and can include conditions such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Rett syndrome, etc.[1] Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood, occurring in 2-3 in 1,000 children.[2,3]

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Cancer

Cancer

Cancer is a large, heterogeneous class of diseases in which a group of cells display uncontrolled growth, invasion that intrudes upon and destroys adjacent tissues, and often metastasises, where the tumour cells spread to other locations in the body.[1]

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Growth Faltering / undernutrition

Growth Faltering / undernutrition

Growth faltering (failure to thrive) can occur during childhood. It is defined as a growth rate below that appropriate for a child's age and sex.[1] It can affect height, weight and head circumference with values being lower than expected.[1] Growth faltering accounts for 1–5% of paediatric hospital admissions under 2 years of age, and has been reported to be up to 21% in community in the paediatric population.[2,3]

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Others

Others

Inflamatory Bowel Diseases, Critical Care, Congenital Heart Disease, or Short Bowel Syndrome are conditions that can also lead to special nutritional needs.

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